TUC warning over industrial strategy

The Trades Union Congress (TUC) has warned the government that a new report on how to boost regional growth must include a major change in industrial …

The Trades Union Congress (TUC) has warned the government that a new report on how to boost regional growth must include a major change in industrial policy.

Former deputy prime minster Lord Heseltine's paper is set to be published today (October 31st) and the TUC has said it should push for government action to ensure more regional growth away from London and the south-east.

It attacked ideas like regionalised pay as being likely to increase inequality and called for more investment in skills and apprenticeships, particularly for young unemployed people, plus a recognition of the role that trade unions can play.

TUC general secretary Brendan Barber said: "This review could start to deliver the change we need by recognising a new role for government in shaping and boosting growth, particularly in the regions. We need the same public and private sector drive that gave us the Olympics, now harnessed to renew the economy.

"But half-baked free-market small-state approaches like regional pay actively hinder regional renaissance."

Mr Barber went on to claim that the TUC's vision is widely supported, but at the same time is not in accord with the Treasury's view.

Whatever the economic future for the various different parts of Britain, those who are struggling in debt may find it more productive to seek solutions like a debt management plan now than wait and hope for the economy in their part of the country to deliver them new job and pay opportunities.

Although the UK is now out of recession, some may find they have yet to benefit.

Construction workers may be in this category as the sector is the only part of the economy that declined in the third quarter.

The sector declined by 2.5 per cent in the three months to September, although this fall was at least less than the three per cent seen in the second quarter.

Posted by Paul Thacker

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