Four out of ten families cut back on food to pay mortgage or rent

More than four out of ten (42 per cent) families with children in the UK cut back on food last year to help stay in their homes.

This comes from ne…

More than four out of ten (42 per cent) families with children in the UK cut back on food last year to help stay in their homes.

This comes from new research by the charity Shelter, which surveyed 4,060 adults to see how they are coping with the current economic climate.

On top of this, more than one in four (27 per cent) people reduce usage of gas and electricity to ensure they had enough money in the bank to pay their mortgage or rental costs.

The research found families with children were the hardest pressed, with 31 per cent of people cutting back on food and 20 per cent reducing fuel consumption. It appears the cost of raising children is taking its toll on families, as parents are skipping meals to ensure they get enough food.

Also of note was that 64 per cent of the families with children surveyed said they had struggled to pay for their mortgage or rent last year, compared to 57 per cent overall.

The next wave of government cuts is due to take place in April and it is feared these people will have an even tougher time finding the money to pay for living expenses and housing costs.

One participant in the survey was Teri from Essex who said she was struggling to pay the rent as well as feed, clothe and provide basic essentials to her daughter.

Chief executive of Shelter Rob Campbell said: “The effects of the recession, the rising cost of housing and cuts to the housing safety net have left many families in a very vulnerable position. Every 15 minutes a family in England finds themselves homeless”

With the benefit changes set to come into effect, families are bracing themselves for tough times. Should these people be struggling as a result of paying off debt each month, they could possibly consider taking out a debt consolidation loan to make the overall outgoings smaller, potentially freeing up funds for essentials such as food.

By Joe White

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