Bankruptcy leads football manager into crime

A bankrupt football manager found the only way to get badly-needed cash to deal with his debts was to turn to drug crime, it has been revealed.

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A bankrupt football manager found the only way to get badly-needed cash to deal with his debts was to turn to drug crime, it has been revealed.

Such a situation emerged when Kenneth Scragg borrowed £1,100 off a pair of men he only knew vaguely in return for £150 off per week as a reward for helping to cultivate cannabis plants, the North Staffordshire Sentinel reports.

Mr Scragg’s solicitor told North Staffordshire Magistrates Court: “He was under extreme financial pressures. His business was not going well and he was short of money. He stupidly agreed to allow his premises to be used.”

The manager of Leek-based non-league team Blue Mugge admitted his involvement in the crime to police, after a raid on his industrial units in the town – where he worked as a part-time maker furniture – uncovered the drug crop just over a year ago.

Such a situation may have been avoided had Mr Scragg sought an individual voluntary arrangement to deal with his debts.

While this can lower a credit rating, it does not leave a person completely excluded from having any credit for six years in the way bankruptcy does.

Those facing insolvency can get into trouble through carelessness, but this is not always the case, it was noted recently.

Speaking to Surrey station Eagle Radio, Charles Bruce, manager of Camberley-based debt help agency Frontline, said changes in circumstances such as divorce, redundancy and illness can undermine the ability to make repayments.

Frontline, a church-based organisation, was established after it was revealed the average adult in Camberley has a credit card debt of £2,000.

By Joe White

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