Broken boilers set to leave people out of pocket as callouts increase

Many people in the UK could be hit by an unexpected bill in the coming weeks as they start to turn on their heating systems.

Boiler-related issues …

Many people in the UK could be hit by an unexpected bill in the coming weeks as they start to turn on their heating systems.

Boiler-related issues often go unnoticed during the summer months and it appears individuals are already having problems as the AA has reported a 72 per cent increase in callouts from the first week in September to the first week in October.

Naturally, maintenance visits are expected to increase further as temperatures are predicted to fall further as winter rolls in.

Helen Brooker, head of AA Home Membership, said: "Many people are turning their heating back on for what could be the first time in months only to find that something's gone wrong."

She explained how it is a good idea for people to switch on their heating during the summer from time to time in order to see if things are working properly. Though this may appear counter-intuitive, it means the system can continue ticking over when it is not being used frequently.

With rising fuel bills, many UK adults are opting to stay away from heating altogether and attempt to last for as long as possible before resorting to the thermostat.

For example, 31 per cent of people said they would never turn their heating on in September, whatever the weather, according to a survey conducted by the AA. However, more than a quarter (27 per cent) did in fact have their heating on in the month. 

Four out of ten individuals (39 per cent) plan to switch theirs on in October, while 20 per cent will wait it out until November. Just one in fifty said they will hold out until December after memories of last year's cold snap linger in the back of their minds.

Heating bills in the UK are set to soar and one energy firm, SSE, has already increased its prices. The cost of fixing a boiler could be catastrophic to household finances so it important to ensure it is well maintained and in full working order.

By Joe White

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