We’re happier than 12 months ago, reckons spare cash study

For generations, humans have believed that money equates to happiness, and the more cash you’ve got to splash, the better your life is.

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For generations, humans have believed that money equates to happiness, and the more cash you’ve got to splash, the better your life is.

There are exceptions obviously but research from Sunlife Insurance last year proved a strong link between happiness and how much spare cash we’re left to play with once the essentials were taken care of.

Current political and social disruption may suggest otherwise but we’re happier than 12 months ago if this year’s report is to be believed, with the average British household having £102 of spare cash every week, £20 more than this time last year. That breaks that down to £44 per person per week, £8.63 more than a year ago.

The happiest ten per cent of UK households had £158 spare cash or £69 per person per week, the study found, which means households only need to find an extra £56 a week to be amongst the country’s happiest.

Sunlife’s 2016 ‘Cash Happy’ report also identifies a gender gap with men having more spare cash than women every week – £55 to £37 – despite a £10 increase on last year’s figure. This progress is diluted by men’s spare cash similarly jumping by £9.

People cohabiting enjoy the most spare cash, with £87 each, while those living alone have the least (£44).

So how can Brits milk the most happiness out of this spare cash? Bowling, apparently.

Yep, rolling a ball at ten helpless pins was found to be the most surefire way to boost happiness even further, following by a trip to the theatre, and playing sports.

A Sunlife spokesperson said “You don’t need to be a millionaire for money to buy you happiness.

“Just by cutting out a takeaway coffee you can save around £2 a day, so becoming one of the most cash happy in the country could be much easier than we might think.”

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